Virtual Servers
Virtual servers that you create in the DCD are provisioned and hosted in one of IONOS physical data centers. Virtual servers behave exactly like physical servers. They can be configured and managed with your choice of the operating system. Information on creating a server can be found here.
Boot options: For each server, you can select to boot from a virtual CD-ROM/DVD drive or from a storage device (HDD/SSD). Any operating system can be used on the platform. The only requirement is the use of KVM VirtIO drivers. IONOS provides a number of ready-to-boot images with current versions of Linux operating systems.
We do not offer Windows images during the PoC. However, you can upload your own images with our FTP access, including your own licensed Windows images.

Secure your data, enhance reliability, and set up high-availability scenarios by deploying your virtual servers and storage devices across multiple Availability Zones.
Assigning different Availability Zones ensures that servers or storage devices reside on separate physical resources at IONOS.
For example, a server or a storage device assigned to Availability Zone 1 resides on a different resource than a server or storage device assigned to Availability Zone 2.
You have the following Availability Zone options:
  • Zone 1
  • Zone 2
  • A - Auto (default; our system automatically assigns an Availability Zone upon provisioning)

If the capacity of your Virtual Data Center no longer matches your requirements, you can still increase or decrease your resources after provisioning. With upscaling resources, you can change the resources of a virtual server during operation without restarting it. This means you can add RAM or NICs ("hot plug"). This allows you to react to peak loads quickly without compromising performance.
After uploading, you can define the properties for your own images before applying them to new storage volumes. The settings must be supported by the image, otherwise, they will not work as expected. After provisioning, you can change the settings directly on the storage device, which will require a restart of the server.
The types of resources that you can scale without rebooting will depend on the operating system of your VMs. Since kernel 2.6.25, Linux has LVO modules installed by default, but they may have to be activated manually depending on the derivative. For more information see the Linux VirtIO page.
For IONOS images, the supported properties are already preset. Without restarting the server, its resources can be scaled as follows:
  • Upscaling: CPU, RAM, NICs, storage volumes
  • Downscaling: NICs, storage volumes
Scaling up is the increase or speed up of a component to handle a larger load. The goal is to increase the number of resources that support an application to achieve or maintain accurate performance. Scaling down means reducing system resources, whether or not you've used the scaling up approach. Without restarting the server, only upscaling can be done.

CPU Types: Virtual server configurations are subject to the following limitations, by CPU type:
AMD CPU
Components
Minimum
Maximum
Cores
1 core
62 cores
RAM
0,25 GB RAM
230 GB RAM
NICs and storage
0 PCI connectors
24 PCI connectors
CD-ROM
0 CD-ROMs
2 CD-ROMs
Intel® CPU
Components
Minimum
Maximum
Cores
1 core
51 cores
RAM
0,25 GB RAM
230 GB RAM
NICs and storage
0 PCI connectors
24 PCI connectors
CD-ROM
0 CD-ROMs
2 CD-ROMs
A single Intel® physical core with Hyper-Threading Technology is exposed to the operating system of your virtual server as two distinct “logical cores”, which process separate threads.
RAM Sizes: Because the working memory (RAM) size cannot be processed during the initial configuration, newly provisioned servers with more than 8 GB of RAM may not start successfully when created from IONOS Windows images.
Live Vertical Scaling: Linux supports the entire scope of IONOS Live Vertical Scaling, whereas Windows is limited to CPU scaling. Furthermore, it is not possible to use LVS to reduce storage size after provisioning.
Export as PDF
Copy link
On this page
Availability Zones
Live Vertical Scaling (LVS)
Limitations